On this day…… 100 years ago; 05/08/1914

Remembered today:

 

S/6075 Lance Corporal HORACE K. TATTERSALL Army Ordnance Corps

 

He is buried in Cairo and commemorated on the Cairo war memorial.

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On this day……. 100 years ago; 04/08/1914

Remembered today:
CH.8671 Private G. Davies Royal Marine Light Infantry
A Chatham Division Royal Marine, he is buried in Middlesex at St.Pancras cemetery.

We Shall Remember Them…….

Today I shall be laying the wreath on behalf of the British Red Cross Society at the remembrance parade in our local town. I was asked to write something for the note in the wreath, and whilst researching what to write, I found out that during the Great War, 56 of my fellow British Red Cross volunteers gave their lives;

 

BALDWIN, J

BARKER, MAURICE THOMPSON

BEAN, ARTHUR ROBERT

BLATCH, H

BOOTH, W F

BORLAND, G

BOYS, HERBERT

BRADBURY, FREDERICK GEORGE

BRITTAIN, FRANK MORRIS

BROWN, CHARLES SEPTIMUS

BULLIMORE, JOHN THOMAS

BURNETT, ARTHUR (CHICK)

BURT, ECEMETERY

CLARK, ARTHUR RUSSELL SAMUEL

COATES, WINIFRED STANLEY

CONNOR, JAMES

CRIGAN, ERIC CLAUDIUS DAVISON

CURNOW, CLIFFORD

DAVIS, CHARLES FREDERICK

DEAN-PITT, DOUGLAS C.

ELLEN, BERNARD LIONEL

ELLIS, J E

FIELDING, JOSHUA

FLEMING, M B

FRAME, WILLIAM McCLYMONT

GOODYEAR, ROLAND THORNTON

GRAYSON, LEWIS

GRINDLAY, JAMES

HARDIE, SAMUEL WHITE

HARMAN, ALBERT VICTOR

HARTRUP, HENRY

HEAD, FREDERICK JOHN

HILDER, W

HURST, GEORGE E.

INNES, JOHN ALFRED

JARVIS, L G

KING, WILLIAM

KITCHING, FREDERICK OVEREND

LEE, H S

LODGE, FREDERICK WILLIAM

LYTTELTON-ROGERS, CAMERON WATERS

MELROSE, J

MEREDITH, EDMUND RICHARD

PACE, FREDERICK

PEAPLE, WILLIAM LEONARD

PIERPOINT, JOHN ARCHIBALD

PROCTER, CHARLES LEWIS

REES, JOSEPH

ROBERTS, E

RUSS, C

SMITH, ROLAND HADFIELD

TAYLOR, ERNEST

TOSH, J

TRAVERS, A

WALLIS, W

WELLS, RICHARD LESLIE

 

These men and women, were serving with the British Red Cross Society overseas; http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead.aspx?cpage=1&sort=name&order=asc The majority were serving in France, others were serving in Iraq, and India. Of these there were 3 Croix De Guerre (France), a Medal for Military Valour (Italy), and numerous other awards, with many of the volunteers having formerly been regular army or holding medical qualifications in civilian life, that they felt could be of use.

 

As I lay the wreath at 11.00 today, I shall be thinking, not only of these 56, but of all the volunteers; my fellow volunteers, who have served with quiet courage, going out into danger completely unarmed, and tended to those in need.

How to find a name from nothing….. logical deduction for amateur historians

Sometimes you’ll pick up a medal group, or even a photo or uniform, and it has medals but no name…. no doubt family historians have this probably on a more regular basis than one would think. I had this same problem a few years back, and I thought people might find it useful to see the logical sequence of how to discover who the person is.

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I bought a frame, and in it was a picture and a set of miniature medals (above – which are left to right);

 

1. Order of the Bath – Companion (CB)
2. Distinguished Service Order (DSO) (w. bar)
3. Queen’s South Africa Medal, 1899-1902
4. 1914-1915 Star
5. British War Medal, 1914-20
6. Victory Medal, 1914-18 (w. MID X5)
7. Army & RAF General Service Medal, 1918-1962
8. 1939-1945 Star
9. Defence Medal
10. British War Medal, 1939-1945
11. George V Coronation Medal, 1911
12. George V Silver Jubilee Medal, 1935
13. George VI Coronation Medal, 1937
14. Order of the Légion d’Honneur – Chevalier (France)

 

Now ordinarily five of these medals would contain a name, rank, number and regiment, however, with miniatures, ribbon bars and photographs you don’t always have this luxury. The process is fairly easy and deathly logical, however it does take some serious commitment, luck, and occasionally an intuitive jump.

So, I started by isolating all Distinguished Service Order’s before 1945 with a single additional bar (in the DSO awards book) – this came to roughly 800-900 awards, I was so glad it was only a few……

I then looked at this list and discounted all those who had not served in the Boer war, I then checked the regiments they were with and their regimental bar entitlement for the Queens South Africa medal.


Then I isolated all those awarded further bars (WW1, WW2) or other gallantry awards, discounting those who didn’t fit the medal list, and including those who did… my list was by this time about 60 people, getting closer all the time 😀

As it had come down to roughly 60 names; I had to go through these manually looking for similarities, I.e discounting any killed in WW1, those who had served abroad in WW2 anywhere that would have given him a WW2 star medal indicating service in Italy, France and Germany etc.

This left just 1 man who matched the gallantry awards, Order of the Bath and foreign awards etc. – (all in all roughly only 25 hours of research all tolled, one of my shorter searches 😀 ).

 

The man in the picture and who the medals belonged too…. is Lieutenant General Sir Michael Henry Barker.

 

barker2 

 

http://www.unithistories.com/officers/Army_officers_B01.html: [this website is an invaluable source for higher ranking officers.]

 

Education: Malvern College (1897.2-1902); Staff College (psc),

 

Military Service:

1902 served in Militia (4th Battalion The East Surrey Regiment), South African War (Queen’s Medal, two clasps 14 & 26) (embodied militia for 210 days)

04.07.1903 Commissioned, Lincolnshire Regiment

04.05.1910 – 03.11.1913 Adjutant, …

18.12.1913 – 05.1915 Adjutant, Special Reserve

1914 – 1919 served World War I (despatches, DSO and Bar, Legion of Honour, Brevet Maj., Brevet Lt.Col.): France & Belgium 12.05.1915-02.11.1917 & 26.04.1918-11.11.1918, Italy 02.11.1917-19.04.1918

26.04.1918 – 01.04.1919 Brigade Commander, 53rd Infantry Brigade, France

18.03.1920 – 31.01.1921 General Staff Officer, 2nd grade (GSO2), … (India)

04.02.1921 – 12.02.1924 Instructor, Senior Officers’ School, Belgum, India

22.03.1927 – 22.03.1931 transferred as Commanding Officer, 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment

02.04.1931 – 30.03.1933 Assistant Adjutant & Quartermaster-General (AA&QMG), 4th Division (Eastern Command) (Colchester)

31.03.1933 – 30.09.1935 Brigadier General Staff, Horse Guards (Eastern Command) (UK)

01.12.1936 – 13.07.1939 Director of Recruiting and Organization, War Office (CB)

14.07.1939 – 04.03.1940 General Officer Commanding, British Forces in Palestine and Transjordan (temporary) (despatches)

07.03.1940 – 21.04.1940 General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Aldershot Command

22.04.1940 – 07.06.1940 specially employed as Corps Commander, I Corps (France) [handed over command 31.05.1940 to Maj.Gen. H.R.L.G. Alexander]

07.08.1940 – 15.02.1941 specially employed as General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Aldershot Command

15.08.1941 – 15.10.1946 Regular Army Reserve of Officers [attained age limit]

Deputy Regional Commander for Civil Defence, London 1941-1942.

Colonel, York and Lancaster Regiment, 01.04.1936-20.03.1946.

Deputy Lieutenant (DL), Essex, 03.06.1946.

 

So there you go with a bit of perseverance, you can find out who someone is in a photograph, or who the medals you have were awarded too….. 🙂

The last casualties of the Great War for Civilisation……….

On the 11th of November, 861 British and Commonwealth soldiers were killed. Now most of us will never have heard of any of the men killed on this day, but I would like to bring just two of their names to your attention. The first is a man called George Ellison and the second: George Laurence Price. Why? Because on the 11th November 1918, just half an hour before the Armistice came into effect, Private Ellison was killed, making him officially the last British Soldier to be killed in the Great War for Civilisation; 1914-1918. The Second man; George Laurence Price, was killed at 10.58, 2 minutes before the war ceased, became the last Commonwealth soldier killed in the Great War.

George_E_Ellison

Private George Ellison; 5th Royal Irish Lancers.

Ellison was born and lived at 49, Edmund Street, Bank, Leeds, he was the Son of James W. and Mary Ellison. Early in his life, he joined the army as a regular soldier, but had left by 1912 when he got married to Hannah Maria Burgan and had become a coal miner. Sometime just before the outbreak of war he was recalled to the army, joining the 5th Royal Irish Lancers, serving in the army at the start of the war. He fought at the Battle of Mons in 1914, and several other battles including the Battle of Ypres, Battle of Armentières, Battle of La Basee, Battle of Lens, Battle of Loos, and Battle of Cambrai on the Western Front. He was killed an hour and a half before the armistice, on a patrol on the outskirts of Mons, Belgium.

George_lawrence_price

Private George Price; 28th ‘Northwest’ Battalion Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment)

He was born in Falmouth, Nova Scotia, on December 15, 1892, and raised on Church Street, in what is now Port Williams, Nova Scotia. He lived in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, when he was conscripted on October 15, 1917. He served with “A” Company of the 28th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. On November 11, Pte Price was part of an advance to take the small village of Havré. After a crossing of the Canal du Centre into the town of Ville-sur-Haine under German machine gun fire, Price and his patrol moved toward a row of houses intent on pursuing the machine gunner who had harassed their crossing of the canal. The patrol had entered the house from which they had thought the shooting had come, but found the Germans had exited through the back door as they entered the front. They then pursued into the house next door and again found it empty. George Price was fatally shot in the region of his heart by a German sniper as he stepped out of the house into the street, against contrary advice from a house occupant, at 10:58 a.m., November 11, 1918. He died just 2 minutes before the armistice ceasefire, that ended the war, came into effect at 11 a.m

Now there are other soldiers I should name here as well:

USA: Pvt Henry Gunther of Baltimore, MD, Company A, 313th Infantry, 79th Division of the US Army: Died 10.59 11/11/1918 Officially, Gunter was the last man to die in World War One. His unit had been ordered to advance and take a German machine gun post. It is said that even the Germans – who knew that they were literally minutes away from a ceasefire – tried to stop the Americans attacking. But when it became obvious that this had failed, they fired on their attackers and Gunter was killed. His divisional record stated:

“Almost as he fell, the gunfire died away and an appalling silence prevailed.”

FRANCE: Augustin Trebuchon from the 415th Infantry Regiment. He was a runner and was in the process of taking a message to his colleagues at the front informing them of the ceasefire. He was hit by a single shot and killed at 10.50. In total, 75 French soldiers were killed on November 11th but their graves state November 10th. Two theories have been forwarded for this discrepancy. The first is that by stating that they died on November 10th before the war had ended, there could be no question about their family’s entitlement to a war pension. The other theory, is that the French government wanted to avoid any form of embarrassment or political scandal should it ever become known that so many died on the last day of the war. [http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/november_11_1918.htm]

Augustin Trébuchon was born at Montchabrier (near Le Malzieu-Ville in the Lozère) on 30 May 1878, with four younger brothers and sisters. His mother died when he was young and his father nine years later. He had been in the army since the war began in 1914. He was a communal shepherd and played accordion at village marriages before volunteering for the army on 4 August 1914. He joined the 415th Infantry Regiment as a messenger. He had already served in the second battle of the Marne and at Verdun, Artois and the Somme before arriving in the Ardennes at the end of the war. He had twice been wounded, including badly in his left arm by an exploding shell.  Upon his promotion to the rank of Soldat de Première Classe (Private First Class) in September 1918 it was said that he was “a good soldier having always achieved his duty, of remarkable calm, setting the best example to his young comrades.”

Trébuchon, as a messenger, knew an agreement had been signed before the rest of his unit. At Vrigne-sur-Meuse, in the Ardennes, the 163rd Infantry Division was ordered to attack an élite German unit, the Hannetons.  General Henri Gouraud told his men to cross the Meuse and to attack “as fast as possible, by whatever means and regardless of cost”.  It has been speculated that the attack was to end any possible hesitations by German negotiators at Compiègne, that Maréchal Foch believed the Germans were reluctant to sign and so ordered Général Philippe Pétain to press on across the Meuse.

Trébuchon was halfway between Sedan and Charleville-Mézières. Rain was falling and the Meuse was flooding. Its width was put at 70m. The temperature was well below freezing. Warfare had destroyed bridges across the river and sappers worked by night and in fog to build a plank footbridge across a lock. There had been no reconnaissance of the other bank because bad weather had kept the spotter plane on the ground. Around 700 men crossed the river a little after 8am, taking a telephone wire with them. Some fell in the river and the first deaths were by drowning.

The fog cleared at 10.30am and the French could see the Germans installed a little higher than them, a few hundred metres away. The French were spread over three kilometres between the Meuse and a railway line. The Germans opened fire with machine guns. The French sent up a spotter plane now that the fog had lifted and the artillery on the other bank could open fire without fear of killing their own side. Darkness fell again at 6pm and the battle continued until news of the armistice arrived.

The last of the 91 French soldiers to die was Trébuchon, “with a red hole in his right side”, probably a figure of speech as this expression comes from Arthur Rimbaud’s very famous poem “Le Dormeur du Val” (The Sleeper in the Valley). He was 40. He fell near the railway line with his message still in his hand. It read “Rassemblement à 11h 30 pour le ravitaillement – “Muster at 11.30 for food.” The armistice followed and the French withdrew without honouring their dead.

GERMANY: Lieutenant Tomas: After 11:00, he approached some American soldiers to let them know that, since the war was over, he and his men were vacating a house and it would be available. Unfortunately, no one had informed the Americans of the Armistice and they shot him.

What did you do in the war Grandma??

In September 1943 a Handley Page Halifax dropped a smock covered figure into France as they had done on many occasions previously… The shadowy figure landed concealed their parachute and went to find their contacts, most of this sounds like it has come from your run of the mill WW2 spy thriller, this shadowy figure lead 3,000 armed resistance fighters and had a million franc bounty on their head. This sounds further like a spy novel, until you find out that this shadowy figure was a fresh faced 29 year old, female SOE agent called Pearl Witherington. As D-Day fast approached Pearl, led many raids on railway lines and supply routes, attempting to prevent German soldiers moving north or back to Germany. During her time in France she met her future husband Henri Cornioley, a young French Resistance fighter she had met before the war. They survived, a close call in a pitched battle over a German guard house, getting split up and fearing one another dead, they managed to make it back to England where they married in October 1944. She was recommended for the Military Cross for her bravery, but as a woman was deemed ineligible and offered a civil MBE instead.

 She wrote a strongly worded letter to the then, War Department, refusing the award;

“I consider it most unjust to be given a civilian decoration…Our training, which we did with the men, was purely military…and I personally was responsible for the training and organisation or nearly 3,000 men for sabotage and guerrilla warfare.”

It was not until 2004, that the Queen presented her with the CBE and then two years later she was finally given her parachute wings. She died in February 2008, aged 93, nine years after her husband.

news-graphics-2008-_660777a

 

Oh what a lovely war………..

_54819717_topsecret

Antonia Hunt (Nee Lyon-Smith), her father, a successful, and gallant army officer, was trapped in France in 1939 behind the enemy lines in France when the Nazi’s invaded.  Unbeknownst to me when I bought her fathers medals in 2002, although more was going to come to light over her wartime exploits than I could have ever imagined…..

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BBC reported:

Intelligence officers suspected a teenage daughter of a British brigadier was a German officer’s mistress during World War II, National Archives files show.

Antonia Lyon-Smith was interned by the Germans in 1940 when she was 15 and living in France, but released due to her youth.

She was taken in by a Gestapo officer and another Nazi wanted to marry her.

MI5 suspected she had betrayed her knowledge of the Resistance.

The previously-secret files said Antonia was the daughter of Royal Artillery officer Brigadier Tristram Lyon-Smith and a Canadian mother.

A Nazi officer called Karl Gagel initially tried to claim there was no intimate relationship between the teenager and himself, but “there was nevertheless an understanding that when Germany and Britain ceased to be enemies they would become engaged,” the file shows.

Antonia revealed in her 1982 autobiography Little Resistance: A Teenage English Girl’s Adventures In Occupied France that she had kissed the officer but was never engaged to him.

She had tried unsuccessfully to flee France for Switzerland, but eventually gave up.

Ed Hampshire, from the National Archives: “She had various liaisons with Gestapo officers”

In December 1942, she had been asked to write a letter of introduction for a friend of Claude Spaak, the brother of the Belgian foreign minister.

She later told MI5 that she had no idea Mr Spaak was heavily involved in the Resistance.

The Nazis intercepted the letter, and she was interrogated in Paris by senior Gestapo officer Heinz Pannwitz.

She claimed she was held in Paris in solitary confinement from October 1943 until January 1944, when she was allowed to leave and stay with her cousin.

But her MI5 file includes a report from a Nazi source suggesting that she enjoyed “comparative freedom as a species of office girl” for Pannwitz.

It added that she “did little but make tea, sew and listen to radio”, and even went on shopping expeditions with Gagel.

During interrogation by MI5 she did not disclose anything about her relationship with Gagel – which led the British intelligence officer to conclude that she was his mistress and “almost certainly” betrayed all her knowledge of a Resistance group to the Germans.

Letter to father:

Antonia has not the slightest intention of ever seeing Karl again if she can possibly avoid it”Brig Tristram Lyon-Smith

Gagel’s feelings for Antonia were discovered after her irate father received a letter from Gagel via his bank branch in East Sussex.

The former Gestapo officer wrote to the bank in October 1945: “I should be much obliged if you would kindly inform Miss Antonia Lyon-Smith that I shall be in Germany for some time to come, and that I should like to have news of her.”

An MI5 officer who interviewed Brig Lyon-Smith about his daughter noted: “She was apparently ‘befriended’ by Karl Gagel, who ostensibly arranged that she should not be sent to Fresnes prison in return for her undertaking to marry him when the war was over.

“Antonia has not the slightest intention of ever seeing Karl again if she can possibly avoid it.”

Her own account, given in 1946, of her time with the Gestapo was described as “rather disconnected” and “not satisfactory” by an MI5 officer.

At first the MI5 officer concluded: “It is clear to me that she was holding back on this matter [of Gagel], though whether simply because her association with him was a disreputable one or not, I cannot say.”

But after further research, the officer wrote in April 1946: “My own view is that she certainly became Karl Gagel’s mistress and almost certainly disclosed to the Germans all her knowledge of the Spaak organisation, which I believe to have been considerably greater than she admits.”

He even raised concerns two months later about whether Miss Lyon-Smith was suitable to continue working for the Women’s Royal Naval Service, but Royal Navy intelligence considered her not to be a risk as as she was about to marry.

Her autobiography, published under her name from her second marriage, Antonia Hunt, was released in 1982, more than two decades before her death. In it, she mentions a surprise visit from the comic author PG Wodehouse when she was seriously ill while in Gestapo custody in Paris.

Related links:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14662543

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2030195/Brigadiers-daughter-15-Gestapo-chiefs-lover-school-Brittany.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8722496/Nazi-SS-officer-fell-for-teenage-brigadiers-daughter-who-betrayed-French-Resistance.html

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/267212/Brigadier-s-girl-betrayed-secrets-to-Gestapo-lover