On this day……. 100 years ago; 06/08/1914

Remembered today:

 

CH/17226 Private William Thomas Lacey, Royal Marine Light Infantry

 

A Chatham Royal Marine, who died aboard “HMS Hussar”, possibly from disease near Malta.

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On this day……. 100 years ago; 04/08/1914

Remembered today:
CH.8671 Private G. Davies Royal Marine Light Infantry
A Chatham Division Royal Marine, he is buried in Middlesex at St.Pancras cemetery.

1914 star; a first.

Tonight I got to hold something that I will always remember, a 1914 star trio, now, not unusual, or rare you might say, this man had no gallantry awards or particularly unusual service, in no far off places, to all intents and purposes it is a normal, run of the mill (not to denigrate his service in any way….) ww1; 1914 star trio…. However, this group had one distinguishing characteristic, not that you’d know it, unless you were told.

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The interesting, and 100% unique piece about this medal group is that, this 1914 star, was the very first star to be awarded…… yes the very first to be awarded!  To hold in your hand the first of anything is amazing, and this was no different.

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Trooper Reeves, shown here, just shortly after receiving his medal, and the caption states this was the very first award of the 1914 star.  Now, Trooper Reeves, your immortality is assured.  Maybe at some point I can find out some more about him, but for now I am content in the knowledge that I have held something, so rare and unusual that very few others will ever have the chance to.  I have also had the chance to share something so rare with my followers.

With thanks to the London Medal Company; for supplying the information on this fabulously rare trio…… http://www.london-medals.co.uk/

Question…..

Whilst listening to the radio on the way home from work yesterday, I turned to Radio 4 and was enjoying the “Moral Maze”, and they were debating the differences between public and private life and if public figures should live with total transparency and that someone who has made bad decisions in their personal life could not lead effectively in their public life.  I got thinking that if this were true, then we should have undoubtedly lost at Trafalgar and that someones poor decisions in their personal life did not necessarily mean they were not a great leader.  If this were true, then Nelson, who had an affair and a bastard child with Emma Hamilton, would today have been lynched and vilified in the press and would therefore never have lead us at Trafalgar, and in that case we would have lost the Napoleonic wars…… We can look at Alexander III king of Macedon, conquered untold lands and his military tactics are still taught today, he had his name applied to over twenty cities, and his influence in the Hellenic society was felt into the 15th century; yet today his private life, and sexual orientation would have been bigger news…. after all he was married twice and had a close relationship with Hephaestion, no different to the insinuation about some cabinet ministers who have left office in disgrace in the past.

 

We could perhaps conclude from this that the media, and their ideology of exposition and public do-goodery is more of a hindrance than a help.   After all, can one say with complete honesty that the fact a man is unfaithful to his wife means he will not be some great military leader, or hold the key to curing the NHS of it’s ills?  Albeit we may well draw some inference from the fact that if he is not honest to the ones they love, can he be honest to the public at large?  Well would we not rather a sinner who has confessed his sins than one whose sins are as yet not found?

 

It is of course a severe moral point, rather than an historical one, but a point I thought that as historians we can perhaps shed some light on, for they discuss whether or not a true leader can lead or rule without total transparency.  All I could think of this was that all the leaders who have lead the longest over the largest empires have been ones who have ruled with total opacity, rather than transparency.  They all had a cult of personality, and covered much up, which I believe helped cement them as rulers, and leaders.  Those who failed at this opacity were the ones who failed to last long, for instance take the fact that King James VII attempted to sell the United Kingdom out to the French and the Catholic church, when this was discovered he was deposed in the Glorious revolution of 1688, and William and Mary took his place, this “transparency” (it need not be a voluntary transparency), caused his downfall.  So perhaps we can conclude that whilst transparency can be a good thing, that perhaps it needs to be tempered with civility from the press and to resist whipping up a storm in a teacup over things that really mean little to public life?

We Shall Remember Them…….

Today I shall be laying the wreath on behalf of the British Red Cross Society at the remembrance parade in our local town. I was asked to write something for the note in the wreath, and whilst researching what to write, I found out that during the Great War, 56 of my fellow British Red Cross volunteers gave their lives;

 

BALDWIN, J

BARKER, MAURICE THOMPSON

BEAN, ARTHUR ROBERT

BLATCH, H

BOOTH, W F

BORLAND, G

BOYS, HERBERT

BRADBURY, FREDERICK GEORGE

BRITTAIN, FRANK MORRIS

BROWN, CHARLES SEPTIMUS

BULLIMORE, JOHN THOMAS

BURNETT, ARTHUR (CHICK)

BURT, ECEMETERY

CLARK, ARTHUR RUSSELL SAMUEL

COATES, WINIFRED STANLEY

CONNOR, JAMES

CRIGAN, ERIC CLAUDIUS DAVISON

CURNOW, CLIFFORD

DAVIS, CHARLES FREDERICK

DEAN-PITT, DOUGLAS C.

ELLEN, BERNARD LIONEL

ELLIS, J E

FIELDING, JOSHUA

FLEMING, M B

FRAME, WILLIAM McCLYMONT

GOODYEAR, ROLAND THORNTON

GRAYSON, LEWIS

GRINDLAY, JAMES

HARDIE, SAMUEL WHITE

HARMAN, ALBERT VICTOR

HARTRUP, HENRY

HEAD, FREDERICK JOHN

HILDER, W

HURST, GEORGE E.

INNES, JOHN ALFRED

JARVIS, L G

KING, WILLIAM

KITCHING, FREDERICK OVEREND

LEE, H S

LODGE, FREDERICK WILLIAM

LYTTELTON-ROGERS, CAMERON WATERS

MELROSE, J

MEREDITH, EDMUND RICHARD

PACE, FREDERICK

PEAPLE, WILLIAM LEONARD

PIERPOINT, JOHN ARCHIBALD

PROCTER, CHARLES LEWIS

REES, JOSEPH

ROBERTS, E

RUSS, C

SMITH, ROLAND HADFIELD

TAYLOR, ERNEST

TOSH, J

TRAVERS, A

WALLIS, W

WELLS, RICHARD LESLIE

 

These men and women, were serving with the British Red Cross Society overseas; http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead.aspx?cpage=1&sort=name&order=asc The majority were serving in France, others were serving in Iraq, and India. Of these there were 3 Croix De Guerre (France), a Medal for Military Valour (Italy), and numerous other awards, with many of the volunteers having formerly been regular army or holding medical qualifications in civilian life, that they felt could be of use.

 

As I lay the wreath at 11.00 today, I shall be thinking, not only of these 56, but of all the volunteers; my fellow volunteers, who have served with quiet courage, going out into danger completely unarmed, and tended to those in need.

How to find a name from nothing….. logical deduction for amateur historians

Sometimes you’ll pick up a medal group, or even a photo or uniform, and it has medals but no name…. no doubt family historians have this probably on a more regular basis than one would think. I had this same problem a few years back, and I thought people might find it useful to see the logical sequence of how to discover who the person is.

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I bought a frame, and in it was a picture and a set of miniature medals (above – which are left to right);

 

1. Order of the Bath – Companion (CB)
2. Distinguished Service Order (DSO) (w. bar)
3. Queen’s South Africa Medal, 1899-1902
4. 1914-1915 Star
5. British War Medal, 1914-20
6. Victory Medal, 1914-18 (w. MID X5)
7. Army & RAF General Service Medal, 1918-1962
8. 1939-1945 Star
9. Defence Medal
10. British War Medal, 1939-1945
11. George V Coronation Medal, 1911
12. George V Silver Jubilee Medal, 1935
13. George VI Coronation Medal, 1937
14. Order of the Légion d’Honneur – Chevalier (France)

 

Now ordinarily five of these medals would contain a name, rank, number and regiment, however, with miniatures, ribbon bars and photographs you don’t always have this luxury. The process is fairly easy and deathly logical, however it does take some serious commitment, luck, and occasionally an intuitive jump.

So, I started by isolating all Distinguished Service Order’s before 1945 with a single additional bar (in the DSO awards book) – this came to roughly 800-900 awards, I was so glad it was only a few……

I then looked at this list and discounted all those who had not served in the Boer war, I then checked the regiments they were with and their regimental bar entitlement for the Queens South Africa medal.


Then I isolated all those awarded further bars (WW1, WW2) or other gallantry awards, discounting those who didn’t fit the medal list, and including those who did… my list was by this time about 60 people, getting closer all the time 😀

As it had come down to roughly 60 names; I had to go through these manually looking for similarities, I.e discounting any killed in WW1, those who had served abroad in WW2 anywhere that would have given him a WW2 star medal indicating service in Italy, France and Germany etc.

This left just 1 man who matched the gallantry awards, Order of the Bath and foreign awards etc. – (all in all roughly only 25 hours of research all tolled, one of my shorter searches 😀 ).

 

The man in the picture and who the medals belonged too…. is Lieutenant General Sir Michael Henry Barker.

 

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http://www.unithistories.com/officers/Army_officers_B01.html: [this website is an invaluable source for higher ranking officers.]

 

Education: Malvern College (1897.2-1902); Staff College (psc),

 

Military Service:

1902 served in Militia (4th Battalion The East Surrey Regiment), South African War (Queen’s Medal, two clasps 14 & 26) (embodied militia for 210 days)

04.07.1903 Commissioned, Lincolnshire Regiment

04.05.1910 – 03.11.1913 Adjutant, …

18.12.1913 – 05.1915 Adjutant, Special Reserve

1914 – 1919 served World War I (despatches, DSO and Bar, Legion of Honour, Brevet Maj., Brevet Lt.Col.): France & Belgium 12.05.1915-02.11.1917 & 26.04.1918-11.11.1918, Italy 02.11.1917-19.04.1918

26.04.1918 – 01.04.1919 Brigade Commander, 53rd Infantry Brigade, France

18.03.1920 – 31.01.1921 General Staff Officer, 2nd grade (GSO2), … (India)

04.02.1921 – 12.02.1924 Instructor, Senior Officers’ School, Belgum, India

22.03.1927 – 22.03.1931 transferred as Commanding Officer, 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment

02.04.1931 – 30.03.1933 Assistant Adjutant & Quartermaster-General (AA&QMG), 4th Division (Eastern Command) (Colchester)

31.03.1933 – 30.09.1935 Brigadier General Staff, Horse Guards (Eastern Command) (UK)

01.12.1936 – 13.07.1939 Director of Recruiting and Organization, War Office (CB)

14.07.1939 – 04.03.1940 General Officer Commanding, British Forces in Palestine and Transjordan (temporary) (despatches)

07.03.1940 – 21.04.1940 General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Aldershot Command

22.04.1940 – 07.06.1940 specially employed as Corps Commander, I Corps (France) [handed over command 31.05.1940 to Maj.Gen. H.R.L.G. Alexander]

07.08.1940 – 15.02.1941 specially employed as General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Aldershot Command

15.08.1941 – 15.10.1946 Regular Army Reserve of Officers [attained age limit]

Deputy Regional Commander for Civil Defence, London 1941-1942.

Colonel, York and Lancaster Regiment, 01.04.1936-20.03.1946.

Deputy Lieutenant (DL), Essex, 03.06.1946.

 

So there you go with a bit of perseverance, you can find out who someone is in a photograph, or who the medals you have were awarded too….. 🙂